https://www.gov.uk/statutory-sick-pay

You can get £95.85 per week Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if you’re too ill to work. It’s paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks.

You must be eligible for SSP.

You cannot get less than the statutory amount. You can get more if your company has a sick pay scheme (or ‘occupational scheme’) - check your employment contract.

There are different sick pay rules for agricultural workers.

There’s a separate guide on Statutory Sick Pay if you’re an employer.

If you cannot work because of coronavirus (COVID-19)

You could get SSP if you’re self-isolating because:

 

You can also get SSP if both of the following apply:

 

You cannot get SSP if you’re self-isolating after entering or returning to the UK and do not need to self-isolate for any other reason.

You could get SSP for every day you’re off work.

If your illness is not related to coronavirus

If your illness is not related to coronavirus, you can get SSP from the fourth day you are off work sick.

What you'll get

You can get £95.85 a week Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) for up to 28 weeks.

If you’re off work because of coronavirus (COVID-19)

How many days you can get SSP for depends on why you’re off work.

If you have a letter saying you’re at very high risk of severe illness from coronavirus

If you have a letter advising you to ‘shield’ (take extra precautions to reduce contact with others) because you’re at very high risk of severe illness from coronavirus, you can get SSP for the period specified in the letter.

In most cases, the letter will be from your doctor or a health authority (for example, the Department of Health and Social Care).

You can be paid SSP for more than one period of shielding if you get another letter.

If you’re self-isolating because you or someone you live with has symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus

You must self-isolate for at least 4 days to be eligible for SSP.

You can get SSP for every day you were self-isolating if you started on or after 13 March.

If you started self-isolating before 13 March, you can get SSP from:

  • the fourth day you were sick - if you had coronavirus symptoms

  • 13 March - if you were self-isolating because someone you live with had symptoms

 

Check you’re eligible for SSP.

Eligibility

To qualify for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) you must:

  • be classed as an employee and have done some work for your employer

  • earn an average of at least £120 per week

  • have been ill, self-isolating or ‘shielding’ for at least 4 days in a row (including non-working days)

  • How many days you can get SSP for depends on why you’re off work.

  • Agency workers are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay.

Telling your employer

You must usually tell your employer you’re unable to work before the deadline they set (or within 7 days if they have not set one).

You could lose some of your SSP if you do not tell your employer in time.

Exceptions

You will not qualify if you:

  • have received the maximum amount of SSP (28 weeks)

  • are getting Statutory Maternity Pay

  • are self-isolating after entering or returning to the UK and do not need to self-isolate for any other reason

 

You can still qualify if you started your job recently and you have not received 8 weeks’ pay yet. Ask your employer to find out more.

You can still qualify if you’re on furlough.

Linked periods of sickness

If you have regular periods of sickness, they may count as ‘linked’. To be linked, the periods must:

  • last 4 or more days each

  • be 8 weeks or less apart

 

You’re no longer eligible for SSP if you have a continuous series of linked periods that lasts more than 3 years.

How to claim

To claim Statutory Sick Pay (SSP), tell your employer by the deadline. Check with your employer how you should tell them.

If you cannot work for 7 or more days (including non-working days) you need:

  • an ‘isolation note’ if you’re unable to work because of coronavirus (COVID-19)

  • a letter or ‘shielding note’ from your doctor or a health authority advising you to shield because you’re at very high risk of severe illness from coronavirus

  • your notification from the NHS or public health authorities if you’ve been told to self-isolate because you’ve come into contact with someone with coronavirus

  • a ‘fit note’ (or sick note) if you’re off sick for another reason

  • a letter confirming the date of your procedure if you’ve been advised to self-isolate before going into hospital for surgery.

Useful Links

Ⓒ Hiclass Accounting 2020

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